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Twist Bioscience, Sophia Genetics Team on Genomic Analysis

NEW YORK – Synthetic biology firm Twist Bioscience said Wednesday that it is teaming with bioinformatics company Sophia Genetics to streamline genomic analysis. 

Sophia, which is headquartered in Saint Sulpice, Switzerland with a US office in Boston, is making its artificial intelligence-based "data-driven medicine" technology platform available to customers of Twist's next-generation sequencing target enrichment products to help researchers accelerate their workflows from sample collection to interpretation. 

"Clinical researchers will benefit from end-to-end, highly accurate and reliable genomic solutions," Sophia Genetics CEO and Cofounder Jurgi Camblong said in a statement. "The combined solution will ultimately help experts precisely detect and characterize genomic mutations and use that information to improve outcomes." 

Twist CEO and Cofounder Emily Leproust added that this partnership will facilitate the shift toward personalization of genomics research. "Pairing our … rapidly customizable enrichment efficiency with Sophia's robust analytical platform provides customers an important solution to achieve clinically actionable data while saving on sequencing costs," she said. 

This news comes one day after South San Francisco, California-based Twist announced that it had inked a deal to bring its target enrichment and sample library preparation kits to genomics firm Miroculus' automation platform. 

The firm this week also introduced two new products, the Twist Comprehensive Exome Panel and the Twist Targeted Methylation Sequencing Solution. The latter is meant to enable the study of methylation pattern changes in research fields including cancer, epigenetics, and non-invasive prenatal testing.  

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